Thursday, August 27, 2020

9:00 am – 10:00 am

GS201 – Robin Weber Symposium: Immunology

This session is in tribute to one of DNA Past Presidents, Robin Weber, who had a passion for Immunology. Participants will be able to confidently identify the different clinical presentations of autoimmune disease.

Learning Objectives:
Describe the pathophysiology and cutaneous clinical manifestations of selected autoimmune disorders.
Explain the importance of skin assessments with descriptions of each selected autoimmune disorder.
Identify common therapeutic modalities for each selected autoimmune disorder with emphasis on treatment outcomes.

Virtual Room V100

Sabrina Newman, MD
JoAnn Zell, MD

10:00 am – 10:30 am

Exhibits/Break

10:30 am – 11:30 am

CS211 – Management Pearls in Adult Cutaneous Lupus Erythematous and Dermatomyositis

This presentation will provide practitioners of dermatology with important clinical information regarding the evaluation, diagnosis, work-up, and management of cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis in adult patients. Describe the pathogenesis, clinical features and criteria for the diagnosis of cutaneous lupus and dermatomyositis.

Learning Objectives:
Compare the clinical features and criteria for the diagnosis of cutaneous lupus and dermatomyositis.
Discuss the progressive treatment approaches for both adult cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis including the pharmacokinetics, indications dosages for NSAIDs, steroids, immunomodulators and antimalarials.

Virtual Room V100

Elizabeth B. Wallace, MD

10:30 am – 11:30 am

CS212 – Applications of Injectables, Pearls and Pitfalls

Many nurses and advanced practice providers would like to incorporate injectables into their practice but know little about techniques, products and precautions with the expanding US market of filler and neuromodulator treatment options.

Learning Objectives:
Describe dermal fillers as products made from absorbable or temporary material for correction of moderate to severe facial wrinkles and skin folds, such as nasolabial folds.
Explain the importance of injection techniques with an understanding of risks, short and long-term side effects, allergic reactions to fillers.
Discuss the importance of appropriate training and injection techniques to avoid relevant anatomy danger zones.

Virtual Room V200

Marianne Woody

11:30 am – 11:45 am

Exhibits/Break

11:45 am – 12:45 pm

GS220 – Sponsored by: Sanofi Genzyme and Regeneron: Revolutionizing Atopic Dermatitis for Children (6-11 Years of Age) With Uncontrolled Moderate-to-Severe AD

Dupixent is indicated for the treatment of patients aged 6 years and older with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis whose disease is not adequately controlled with topical prescription therapies or when those therapies are not advisable. Dupixent can be used with or without topical steroids.

Virtual Room V100

Victor Czerkasij, MA, MSN, FNP-C

12:45 pm – 1:30 pm

Exhibits/Break

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

CS221 – Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis is a common skin disorder that is becoming more prevalent in the United States and in developing countries around the world. This multi-factorial disease affects adults as well as children. The clinical presentation and associated co-morbidities, such as infections and other types of dermatitis, are important to consider to optimize care of these patients. This presentation will focus on clinical aspects of atopic dermatitis in adults as well as preventive approaches and topical and systemic treatments for long-term management. Explain the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of atopic dermatitis.

Learning Objectives:
Describe the diagnosis, treatment, and long-term management of adults with atopic dermatitis including use of topical corticosteroids, topical immunomodulators and short-course systemic corticosteroids in extreme cases
Clarify the monitoring indicators for atopic dermatology patients based on pharmacotherapy treatment knowing when to advance from topical agents and antibiotics for potential infections to systemic therapies including selective medication regimens with identification of the pharmacokinetics and clinical application of each.

Virtual Room V100

Cheryl Armstrong, MD

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm

cS222 – Acne Medications: Mechanism of Action

Multiple acne medications are available to providers. It can be confusing to choose the proper medication for patients. Nurses answer calls from patients with reactions or difficulty from medications. The mechanism of acne for acne medications will be described to enable the learner to understand side-effects and benefits of treatment plan. This will enable the office staff to adequately counsel patients.

Learning Objectives:
Explain the epidemiology, etiology, and pathogenesis diagnostic hallmarks, course, and progress for acne vulgaris.
Describe the pharmacokinetics of current medications used to treat acne, including approaches with skin cleansing, topical medication, systemic medication and combination therapy.
Prescribe topical and systemic medications based on their mechanism of action individually and in combination with other medications in the treatment of acne, including dosing, frequency and potential side effects.

Virtual Room V200

Peggy Vernon, MA, RN, CPNP, DCNP, FAANP